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IN RECONNECTING WITH NATURE, WE COULD REVIVE IT

File Photo June 2012 by David L. Ryan/Globe Staff Charlestown’s Pier 5 could be the next battleground. Renée Loth’s April 23 Opinion column, “Bringing Boston into the wild,” really hit home in thinking about how we consider outdoor activities and open space in a post-pandemic world. If one had to look for a silver lining in all we have been through, among the biggest would be a reappreciation for connecting with nature and the value of safe, healthy open spaces. In the Charlestown Navy Yard sits an empty and dilapidated pier, the historic Pier 5. The city has let this site languish for years, and now it is slated for development. What we don’t need is more development along the waterfront. What we have with Pier 5 is an opportunity to craft a vision that  incorporates open space, climate resiliency, educational opportunities on climate science, and access to the waterfront for all. It would be a shame to lose this rare opportunity to create something open and valuable for generations to come.

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File Photo June 2012 by David L. Ryan/Globe Staff Charlestown’s Pier 5 could be the next battleground. Renée Loth’s April 23 Opinion column, “Bringing Boston into the wild,” really hit home in thinking about how we consider outdoor activities and open space in a post-pandemic world. If one had to look for a silver lining in all we have been through, among the biggest would be a reappreciation for connecting with nature and the value of safe, healthy open spaces. In the Charlestown Navy Yard sits an empty and dilapidated pier, the historic Pier 5. The city has let this site languish for years, and now it is slated for development. What we don’t need is more development along the waterfront. What we have with Pier 5 is an opportunity to craft a vision that  incorporates open space, climate resiliency, educational opportunities on climate science, and access to the waterfront for all. It would be a shame to lose this rare opportunity to create something open and valuable for generations to come.

News & Events

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File Photo June 2012 by David L. Ryan/Globe Staff Charlestown’s Pier 5 could be the next battleground. Renée Loth’s April 23 Opinion column, “Bringing Boston into the wild,” really hit home in thinking about how we consider outdoor activities and open space in a post-pandemic world. If one had to look for a silver lining in all we have been through, among the biggest would be a reappreciation for connecting with nature and the value of safe, healthy open spaces. In the Charlestown Navy Yard sits an empty and dilapidated pier, the historic Pier 5. The city has let this site languish for years, and now it is slated for development. What we don’t need is more development along the waterfront. What we have with Pier 5 is an opportunity to craft a vision that  incorporates open space, climate resiliency, educational opportunities on climate science, and access to the waterfront for all. It would be a shame to lose this rare opportunity to create something open and valuable for generations to come.

News & Events

File Photo June 2012 by David L. Ryan/Globe Staff Charlestown’s Pier 5 could be the next battleground. Renée Loth’s April 23 Opinion column, “Bringing Boston into the wild,” really hit home in thinking about how we consider outdoor activities and open space in a post-pandemic world. If one had to look for a silver lining in all we have been through, among the biggest would be a reappreciation for connecting with nature and the value of safe, healthy open spaces. In the Charlestown Navy Yard sits an empty and dilapidated pier, the historic Pier 5. The city has let this site languish for years, and now it is slated for development. What we don’t need is more development along the waterfront. What we have with Pier 5 is an opportunity to craft a vision that  incorporates open space, climate resiliency, educational opportunities on climate science, and access to the waterfront for all. It would be a shame to lose this rare opportunity to create something open and valuable for generations to come.

News & Events