Boston is asking developers to help fund a sea wall as the city worries about rising water – The Boston Globe

Boston is asking developers to help fund a sea wall as the city worries about rising waterThe program will ask developers to help fund a sea wall to protect the city’s Marine Industrial Park from rising seasBy Andy RosenUpdated August 25, 2021, 5:51 p.m.74A view of the shoreline along Boston Harbor at Swordfish Way. Boston is asking developers in the Raymond L. Flynn Marine Park to pay into a fund that supports a sea wall.DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFFProtecting Boston from rising seas could cost billions of dollars over the coming decades. On that, residents, business owners, and developers all agree. But there’s a big question no one has yet answered: Who’s going to pay for it?This week’s close shave with Tropical Storm Henri and this month’s United Nations report showing the planet warming faster than expected highlight the urgency of finding a solution, advocates say, especially for low-lying areas of the city’s shoreline, such as the Seaport’s Raymond L. Flynn Marine Park.That’s where city officials are experimenting with a new approach to funding climate improvements, asking developers eager to build in the park to help finance a sea wall and other defenses that will protect not just their glimmering new towers of lab space but also the remnants of maritime industry that still operate there.

Boston is asking developers to help fund a sea wall as the city worries about rising water – The Boston Globe

Boston is asking developers to help fund a sea wall as the city worries about rising water

The program will ask developers to help fund a sea wall to protect the city’s Marine Industrial Park from rising seas

By Andy RosenUpdated August 25, 2021, 5:51 p.m.

74

A view of the shoreline along Boston Harbor at Swordfish Way.  Boston is asking developers in the Raymond L. Flynn Marine Park to pay into a fund that supports a sea wall.
A view of the shoreline along Boston Harbor at Swordfish Way. Boston is asking developers in the Raymond L. Flynn Marine Park to pay into a fund that supports a sea wall.DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF

Protecting Boston from rising seas could cost billions of dollars over the coming decades. On that, residents, business owners, and developers all agree. But there’s a big question no one has yet answered: Who’s going to pay for it?

This week’s close shave with Tropical Storm Henri and this month’s United Nations report showing the planet warming faster than expectedhighlight the urgency of finding a solution, advocates say, especially for low-lying areas of the city’s shoreline, such as the Seaport’s Raymond L. Flynn Marine Park.

That’s where city officials are experimenting with a new approach to funding climate improvements, asking developers eager to build in the park to help finance a sea wall and other defenses that will protect not just their glimmering new towers of lab space but also the remnants of maritime industry that still operate there.